Regulator help

Discussion in 'General Home Brew Equipment Discussion' started by Echo, Jun 11, 2019 at 10:51 AM.

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  1. Jun 11, 2019 at 10:51 AM #1

    Echo

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    Hi all,
    I'm doing my first kegging but not sure I'm reading the regulator I have correctly. The one on the right doesn't move, the one on the left starts from just under 10bar, but that's too high I think? I only want about 10psi which is 0.69 bar, off the scale.

     
  2. Jun 11, 2019 at 11:00 AM #2

    Echo

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    15602471488433098406296003623433.jpg
    Here's a close up.
     
  3. Jun 11, 2019 at 12:33 PM #3

    simon12

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    It's a welding regulator, it has the unit as cfh which is cubic feet per hour so it's no good for beer as it controls flow not pressure. You need one that has kpa bar or psi on both gauges.
     
  4. Jun 11, 2019 at 1:07 PM #4

    Echo

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    Thanks, will see what I can find.
     
  5. Jun 11, 2019 at 2:05 PM #5

    kelper

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    Although it's marked in litres per minute and cubic feet per something illegible, it is, in fact, a pressure gauge. If you can measure the pressure downstream by another method, you could mark the psi on this gauge.
     
  6. Jun 11, 2019 at 2:27 PM #6

    simon12

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    Are you sure? My understanding was if set to say 10 cfh it will continually allow that amount through until the cylinder is empty. Are you saying that if set to 10 cfh it will stop at a certain pressure and then at 20 cfh stop at a higher pressure?
     
  7. Jun 11, 2019 at 3:00 PM #7

    peebee

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    It is measuring the pressure, but the pressure that builds up because the gas can't get out instantly. So if you stop up the exit the gauge will read higher and higher until something breaks. But I didn't know that, I'm just reaching that conclusion because I can believe that's what is probably going on (i.e. there is nothing "special" in the cheapo gauge).

    The right-hand high-pressure gauge will stay still until the cylinder is empty. That it is not reading about 850PSI just proves how cr&p these gauges are. See https://www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk/threads/co2-management-primer.67424/.
     
  8. Jun 12, 2019 at 7:26 AM #8

    kelper

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    I think it might measure the pressure before a calibrated orifice. If OP were to unscrew that gauge and it has only one hole it is measuring pressure. To measure flow it would need two holes.
     
  9. Jun 12, 2019 at 10:03 AM #9

    peebee

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    "A calibrated orifice", I missed that in my "invented" description, but I think that still fits into my "nothing special" description. I'd still insist on not reading too much into "calibrated", makes it sound like there is a bit of precision involved.


    Also my description of "how cr&p these gauges are" doesn't mean how cr&p I think @Echo's regulator is, it was referring to that style of gauge in general. But those gauges are cheap and give us an idea of what's going on, which is what we want, the mistake is to treat them as precision instruments.
     
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