Burnt flavour

Discussion in 'General Beer Brewing Discussion' started by RichK, Jul 14, 2019.

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  1. Jul 14, 2019 #1

    RichK

    RichK

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    Been doing AG BIAB for a few months now. My one regular issue is that I'm regularly getting a burnt flavour in my brews.

    These are typically bitters/ipas, mostly maris otter with small addition of flaked barley, crystal & maybe a hint of black barley. But it's occurring with different recipes (whether put together by me or bought as a complete ready to go AG kit).

    A local pub has an on-site micro brewery & I've noticed their (own) beers sometimes has a similar hint of burnt flavour (but not always - yesterday it was spot on). So I don't think it's just me!

    My next thought is to try sparging with much cooler water (am I sparging too hot & flushing out tannins?) I'm sitting the bag in a sieve & then just running water warmed in the kettle (not boiled) through it until I get to the boil volume.

    Anybody got any ideas or suggestions?

    TIA
     
  2. Jul 14, 2019 #2

    foxbat

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    It's not your sparging unless you've also got very high pH. The decoction mash technique for lagers requires portions of the mash to be removed and boiled for up to an hour and that doesn't produce tannins. In a lager, you'd notice.

    What does your kettle element look like after you're done? Is there any burnt on crud? I always recommend stirring during the ramp up from mash to boil to keep crud from settling on the element and to stop sugars from burning at the very high temperatures directly adjacent to the element. Once the boil is recirculating everything under its own power you can stop.
     
  3. Jul 14, 2019 #3

    RichK

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    I've only tested pH once & got 5.5 (which I think is OK). I'm using an induction set up (so no element). I'll try stirring while heating up to boiling next time & see if that makes a difference. I've built an electric stirrer so can use that. The floor of my pot usually has some residue on it when cleaning so maybe that's it?

    Thanks for your suggestion.
     
  4. Jul 14, 2019 #4

    BeerCat

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    What pot do you have? I used to do BIAB with a very thin pot on induction and it was very easy to burn. It's worse if your wort is cloudy as the particulates stick to the bottom and scorch. Had to stir the bottom a lot to try and minimise it.
    For me solution was to recirculate the wort with a pump and using nylon hop bags. The boiler I use now is very thin and if I don't do this chances are it will burn. My next purchase will be a 5mm bottom high end pot.
     
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  5. Jul 14, 2019 #5

    RichK

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    It's a "MegaPot" - base is 4mm thick (apparently) which I'm presuming is reasonable?
     
  6. Jul 14, 2019 #6

    An Ankoù

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    And there's no burnt residue left on the bottom after the boil, I presume. And you've tasted the same in a local microbrewery's beer. I'm thinking along the lines of you're not burning anything at all, but rather you're tasting something from the malt- maybe the crystal that you interpret as "burnt". Is it strong or unpleasant (or both)?
    I once made a recipe with a tad of roasted wheat malt and I hated that flavour. I never used it again and I could always tell when a commercial brewer had used it. Yet, presumably, most drinkers like it.
     
  7. Jul 14, 2019 #7

    GerritT

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    That's the Northern Brewer one? Ought to be good enough quality. Can't find the thickness of their bottom though.
     
  8. Jul 14, 2019 #8

    An Ankoù

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  9. Jul 14, 2019 #9

    RichK

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    Interesting. I don't like the flavour that's coming through & it's intensity does vary a bit.

    The odd thing at the pub, the same beer has the taste sometimes but not always which is part of why I didn't think it was anything in the recipe.

    That's the pot I've got, except mines a smaller (~30l) one.

    Maybe, I also need to try & do a brew that is 100% Maris Otter & see what that's like? Maybe, I also need to try & do a brew that is 100% Maris Otter & see what that's like. I do like a bit of experimentation so that's not a problem.
     
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  10. Jul 15, 2019 #10

    Arcs

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    I know this is a bit OT but, that burnt taste would probably be quite nice in a rich porter or stout and I am not kidding either.
     
  11. Jul 15, 2019 #11

    An Ankoù

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    That's definitely the way forward. If it tastes burnt with a single pale ale malt then you're burning something. If not, then it's most likely an additive. A single hop, too, for the sake of limiting the numb er of variables, although I've never known hops to give a burnt flavour.
     
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  12. Jul 15, 2019 #12

    HarryFlatters

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  13. Jul 15, 2019 #13

    An Ankoù

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    I'm sure Ensign Kim might have a thing or two to say on the matter.
     
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  14. Aug 17, 2019 #14

    RichK

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    Quick update. I've done a simple Simcoe (nearly) Smash. Maris plus a bit of flaked barley. Gave the pot a good clean before. Tried to stir a bit more while heating. Turned out great. No burnt flavours.

    BTW. Simcoe Smash is a big hit. I'll being doing that one again :)
     
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