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First time cold crash

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Libigage

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After cold crashing for 3 days would you raise the temperature back up to fermentation temperature to bottle or just bottle at crash temperatures
 

Buffers brewery

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I Keg/bottle at cold crash temperature too then put Keg/bottles back in the fridge at fermentation temperature (20C) for a couple of weeks then condition at 10C-12C for another couple of weeks.
 

NPi

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Hi Friends

I have a brew in my fermentation fridge. Its been fermenting for 1 week to yesterday Sat 19 Sep 2020.

OG 1064
SP 1012

Fermentation has slowed and I plan to bottle as per brewfather suggests next Sat. (14 days fermenting)

I want to cold crash as when I made my hop additions I didnt use the hop spider and chucked them straight in.

The bottom screen on my brewzilla done a pretty good job of capturing most of the hops but obviously I want to keep the sediment down to a min.

So my question is do I cold crash on Wed allowing 3 days to allow bottling on Sat? Or do I start Cold Crash on Sat after 14 fermentation.

Does it matter a jot?

Cheers all

buddsy
What's your recipe estimate FG as? I may think it could go lower than 1012. Depending on the amount of unfermentables you could likely end up at 1009 or less.
 

Specialbrew

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I just plug my fridge into the heating side of the inkbird. Save messing around changing settings athumb.. fridge is turned on permanently as inkbird tries to heat the fridge up.
 

Simoncbr600steelie

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Hi I have a 5 gallon brew that has nearly finished fermentation, should I put it in the garage to cool & hopefully clear a bit before bottling and will the yeast start again to carbonate the bottles.
Thanks
 

buddsy

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Recently Ive been reading that cold crashing actually does very little if nothing to clear the beer. Test have been made where beers have said to be nicer and no less clear where they have not been chilled.
I seemed to open a can of worms in a different thread about pitching yeast...So has anyone any thoughts as to if cold crashing is worth it or do we just all do it as its what everyone does?

Im just asking as Im thinking about not cold crashing my next brew.


Cheers buddsy (Honestly Im not just trying to stir up a hornets nest :-) )
 

terrym

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Recently Ive been reading that cold crashing actually does very little if nothing to clear the beer. Test have been made where beers have said to be nicer and no less clear where they have not been chilled.
I seemed to open a can of worms in a different thread about pitching yeast...So has anyone any thoughts as to if cold crashing is worth it or do we just all do it as its what everyone does?

Im just asking as Im thinking about not cold crashing my next brew.


Cheers buddsy (Honestly Im not just trying to stir up a hornets nest :-) )
You certainly won't stir up any hornest's nest.
If you have read and perhaps then believe that a crash cool/cold crash period at the end of the fermentation period offers little value in terms of dropping the yeast that's fine, but do compare your results with and without.
I usually try new ideas and if they work use them, if they dont move on.
And in this case, even without a brewfridge, and taking advantage of any temperature where the yeast becomes inactive, a period of cooling at the end of fermentation has obvious benefits for me.
 

buddsy

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And in this case, even without a brewfridge, and taking advantage of any temperature where the yeast becomes inactive, a period of cooling at the end of fermentation has obvious benefits for me.
Hi Thanks

Actually Ive just seen a vid by the m@lt m1ller saying if you dry hop with pellets you will need to cool to allow those to drop out. I think it was David Heath who said about not cold crashing. Keeping the temp up to the end of fermentation giving you quicker carbonation when bottled.

My next brew Im planning a single malt, dual hop (heavy on the hops) so ill give it some thought.

buddsy
 

terrym

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Keeping the temp up to the end of fermentation giving you quicker carbonation when bottled.
So a crash cool period ahead of bottling adds perhaps a day onto the overall carbing period, whilst things warm up before the yeast gets going again.
But in the overall cycle, is that important?
Whats the rush?
 

Hopperty

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Unfortunately that is a widely believed myth. Gases, even of different densities tend to mix (maybe serious different densities would be stay separate like an argon and helium mix). I don't remember where I read up on it to provide a source but I'm sure the CO2 blanket doesn't really exist. It is all to do with the velocity of the gas particles being greater than the effect of gravity.

I attach a gas bag filled with CO2 before cold crashing to avoid O2 getting in.
where do you get a bag of CO2 from ? or do you somehow catch the gas whilst it is brewing.
 

yrhendystu

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I brew kits in the shed and once it's done fermenting I'll take the bucket off the insulation and heat pad and leave it on the concrete floor. Temperature drops right down, bottled beer has been much clearer since I started doing this.

Just thought I'd offer a tip for any fellow low tech brewers.
 
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