Kettle elements, how to?

Discussion in 'General Home Brew Equipment Discussion' started by lokis333, Nov 21, 2019.

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  1. Nov 21, 2019 #1

    lokis333

    lokis333

    lokis333

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    Hi all, after reading about using kettle elements for boiling I think it would be an excellent solution for me at the moment as other options do not look as favourable.

    I would look to install two 2.4kw kettle elements into my 50l aluminium pot
    https://www.brewuk.co.uk/2-4kw-element.html

    My questions are:
    Can I just plug both elements at the wall? i.e. in the kitchen or laundry room (separate sockets)

    How easy is it to get them water tight?

    Are they easy to take off after boil for cleaning?

    I am a complete noob when it comes to electric things, so any help and advice is greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Nov 26, 2019 #2
  3. Nov 26, 2019 #3

    the_quick

    the_quick

    the_quick

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    That what I was using for a better part of the last year, just works. And it is cheap.

    Plugging two of them in the same sockets, just need to check what breaker you have for those sockets, and if anything else runs from them the same moment you use it.

    Easy to make them water tight, easy to remove and clean. I would suggest a false bottom or use of a hop spider. I had previously hops parts burned into the element.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2019
  4. Nov 26, 2019 #4

    stigman

    stigman

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    I'd advise plugging into two seperate sockets. Double skts are type tested at 20amp your two elements together are that. 4800w*230v=20.8A it would work on one but it's Gona get hot!
     
    Drunkula likes this.
  5. Dec 12, 2019 #5

    Richie_asg1

    Richie_asg1

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    If you have an electric cooker isolator switch you can replace it with one that has a 13A socket as well. That is usually a 45A rated supply back to the fusebox, although the socket is still 13A rated. If you plug one element in there and the other in a kitchen socket that should be the better option.
     

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