Three questions about wort aeration

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Old Fart At Play

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Although I've been brewing for over 50 years I am new to this forum and learning a lot. In particular I am re-thinking some of my ingrained habits, especially now that I've invested in some lovely new kit (a G40). I have 3 questions with regard to wort aeration:

1) In the past, the only aeration I ever did was draining from mash tun into FV (top of FV about a foot below tap on mash tun). I have used Safale dried yeasts for years and fermentation has always started within 12 to 24 hours and has proceeded vigorously. Is that sufficient evidence that my aeration was sufficient?

2) I see a lot of talk about paddles and aeration stones etc. Definitely not going to get a stone, but I would consider a paddle. I have a wine de-gassing whip, would that be good enough?

3) Until now, my chilling method has been immersing my FV in a bath of cold water. Works well in about an hour. But that has meant my aeration has been while the wort was hot, ie less able to absorb oxygen. Now, my wort will come out of the G40 already cooled, so does that suggest that I am actually less likely to need to start paddling/whipping?

Ta v much for any observations/suggestions.

Cheers
 

Sadfield

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Carry on as you were. There's no need to aerate wort with Safale active dry yeasts, according to their own literature. Its only a requirement if repitching or using liquid yeast.
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Old Fart At Play

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Carry on as you were. There's no need to aerate wort with Safale active dry yeasts, according to their own literature. Its only a requirement if repitching or using liquid yeast. View attachment 64296

Great, ta. I had seen the Fermentis advice but there is so much on here about aeration that I started to wonder!
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Jim Brewster

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As above, not really needed with the dry yeasts however I don't think it hurts to aerate as much as possible if you can do it simply enough. I have seen breweries using dry yeasts such as US-05, Nottingham without taking extra steps to aerate beyond the inevitable aeration that happens as the wort tumbles into the FV.

My method is to deliberately draw in a bit of air up the syphon tube with the wort which seems to work well and creates lots of small bubbles as it transfers, but it's only feasible because I brew on a small scale.
 
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I sprinkle yeast onto the wort in the fermenter and leave for 15 minutes before giving it a good thrash with a stainless paint stirrer in my drill. Fermentation is usually underway within 8-12 hours.
 

scomet

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G’Day OFAP, Great question and I think part of your answer is in your name! When I brewed kits I loved my beers, then kits and bits ditto. Jumped on the 'All Grain Train' can my beers get any better?? Read lots of books, magazines, blogs, forums (this is the best forum I found for good advice and considered discussion) I am a very competitive person but only with myself; the question of what makes your beer better can only be confirmed by you. I (now) oxygenate my wort (air through a hepa filter) rehydrate yeast on a stir plate, simple temp ferment, keg most of my beer but play with bottles and cask conditioned. Once your beer stops tasting like 'Home Brew' my advice is go play so long as the costs are low why not, the beer does get better! then you decide - Retirement is a beautiful thing… Cheers scomet
 

Old Fart At Play

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Thanks scomet! Yes I remember how great it was when my beer stopped tasting like homebrew - wonderful.

I've been AG brewing for 30 of the 50 years, and have been happy with my beer, very slowly introducing innovations as time went by.

With this new kit I thought it was time to revisit old assumptions, to make some further improvements. Some things will definitely change, because of what the new kit makes possible.

But I'm also realising that many things probably don't need to change!

For example, unless my beer starts turning out less well, I've decided to stick with direct pitching of dried yeast, and I'm not going to introduce extra aeration. For one thing I don't want to change too many things at the same time!

It is a fascinating hobby! And I agree, this is an excellent forum.

Cheers
 

Braufather

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I jumped in on all grain and for my first brews used liquid yeasts, sometimes made starters, and always used an aeration stone.

5 years later while I still use liquid yeast here and there,most of of the time it’s dry yeast sprinkled direct on top and aeration is letting the wort fall from the kettle.

I reckon you are fine as you are!
 

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