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Ban on new petrol and diesel cars in UK from 2030 under PM's green plan

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Cheshire Cat

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By 2030 they will know the distance each car has travelled per period and you will pay for that. What gets me is why no plan for HGV's?
 

The-Engineer-That-Brews

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Well I'd guess there'll still be quite a lot of 'pre-changeover' petrol and diesel cars on the road at that stage, and also lorries and commercial vehicles.
I suspect over the next few years that fossil fuels will in any case face increasing levels of duty, and that non-electric vehicles will see increasing 'green' taxes levied.
Pay-per-mile of driving has been mooted for a while, especially in the bigger cities, but implementation is probably not easy. Motorway toll booths might be easier to implement but would push a lot of traffic onto minor roads.
A fuel duty on electricity would be very difficult, because when you charge at home (as most electric car drivers do, most of the time) then the electricity meter really can't tell whether you're charging your car or running your Burco (grin)
Of course one way of looking at this (I claim no expertise either way) from the Green lobby might be to offset road maintenance costs via the reduced load on the NHS due to the health issues associated with e.g. diesel particulates - these will still be produced by lorries but hopefully a lot of long distance fright can be diverted onto the railways.
 

The-Engineer-That-Brews

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By 2030 they will know the distance each car has travelled per period and you will pay for that. What gets me is why no plan for HGV's?
Whilst the technical capability to do that unquestionably already exists, I can see implementation problems concerning foreign cars, older cars, cars where people 'accidentally' put a hammer through the GPS unit, etc etc etc.
A system based on number plate recognition is certainly possible on motorways but is vulnerable to cloned plates and attacks on the cameras themselves.
Also I can imagine that there could be complaints on 'distanced-based' road pricing that it could unfairly discriminate against people in rural areas or others who have unavoidable increased needs to travel by private car.
 

Chippy_Tea

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The problem for us is there are no charging points in the streets, i live in a terraced street which has one lamppost how are people going to charge these vehicles overnight, fast chargers have been proved to shorten the battery life considerably so anyone buying one will avoid them like the plague, it also takes 1/2 an hour to get to 80% even on rapid chargers so unless you are shopping when are you going to charge your EV?
 

The-Engineer-That-Brews

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The problem for us is there are no charging points in the streets, i live in a terraced street which has one lamppost how are people going to charge these vehicles overnight, fast chargers have been proved to shorten the battery life considerably so anyone buying one will avoid them like the plague, it also takes 1/2 an hour to get to 80% even on rapid chargers so unless you are shopping when are you going to charge your EV?
Rapids aren't too bad, Chippy - it depends to an extent on how intelligent the onboard charging circuitry is. The Tesla FAQ says:
Does Supercharging affect my battery?
The peak-charging rate of the battery may decrease slightly after a large number of high-rate charging sessions, such as those at Superchargers. To ensure maximum driving range and battery safety, the battery charge rate is decreased when the battery is too cold, when it is nearly full or when its condition changes with usage and age. These changes in the condition of the battery may increase total Supercharger time by a few minutes over time.​
My understanding is that if the battery is becoming damaged due to over-use of rapid chargers, Tesla cars just 'turn down the wick' a bit.

Your point about the availability of charging infrastructure in terraced streets is very valid however and so far the best approach anyone has come up with is lampposts - but it's a milted solution at the moment.
 

Leon103

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In the future we won't own our cars. We will all be using companies like uber to get about. Driverless cars taking us from a to b. The government make try to nationalise it or just tax the **** out of it.
 

Chippy_Tea

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Your point about the availability of charging infrastructure in terraced streets is very valid however and so far the best approach anyone has come up with is lampposts - but it's a milted solution at the moment.
Lampposts are one solution but if you only have one and its outside your house you are going to mighty p****d off with not being able to park near your own home, if rapid chargers do not reduce the lifespan of the battery significantly i can see them being used more often, we have 5 fast chargers in a supermarket car park, 2 fast chargers in the town pay and display car park, 1 slow charger in a church car park and a slow charger in Premier Inn car park, not bad for a small market town.

See how many and what type of chargers you have -

 

Northern_Brewer

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Tesla were doing this 5 years ago :

There's also induction charging options. So it's not impossible to imagine cars that park on the street, using self-driving to navigate themselves to the nearest supermarket etc to top up overnight and then be back home in the morning. Or people could charge at work.

Also you're now seeing solar panel kits that can fit on a car that can generate 8-10kWh per day - not a huge amount, but enough to commute or go to the shops on.
 

Rodcx500z

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Nicks90

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For most it won't be an issue. Average daily journey in the UK is 8 miles. Most evs have a 200mile range. So you only need to charge it once fortnight. And if you have a car park at work (who will by law have to provide charging points by then), a simple rota amongst staff would cover that off.
Fast charging can give you 80% charge in an hour, which is 2 weeks charge, so a charging station would also work. You'd never need to charge at home.
Obvs there are always if buts maybes and ah-but, what can you do if you fit in that category? Don't buy a new eV and buy a second hand ICE car come 2030 until people come to their senses and introduce hydrogen cars
 

DavidDetroit

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I don't know if it's a conspiracy or not but don't governments buy up patents on workable alternative engines?
Hydrogen was mentioned above and I saw some video ages ago but wasn't ever sure if it was a legit thing or not.
 

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Electricity costs will go up / taxes on electricity will rise again & I'll get screwed over either way, as my house is heated using economy 7.

Oh & lamppost lighting circuits carry nowhere near enough current to charge an electric car, so someone will have to dig them all up & upgrade the wires, not just the lampposts.

Hydrogen or methanol fuel cells will be a much better route than bloody rechargable batteries
 
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