Fermenting fridge - is this OK?

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Baz Chaz

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Morning gang,

Really dumb question time, sorted out heater yesterday fitted and ready.

Re Inkbird 308 standard model, which I'm looking to order.

Is it really as simple and straightforward as it looks? or have I missed something? Although some of the best designed things are just that, simple!

I assume .... Put the temp probe into fridge, plug heater and fridge into Inkbird. When starting off fermentation set heat at say 22 deg, leave until fermentation finished then re set Inkbird to say 4 deg to cool for x number of days.

Like I said, it seems so obvious that the question is pretty dumb, but occasionally I overthink things!
 
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Galena

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Those of you with 2 brews in the same fridge, I am wanting to do this but I usually do ramped temperature fermentation so wondering how many of you do this and how you manage it with 2 brews?
 

LPD1979

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Morning gang,

Really dumb question time, sorted out heater yesterday fitted and ready.

Re Inkbird 308 standard model, which I'm looking to order.

Is it really as simple and straightforward as it looks? or have I missed something? Although some of the best designed things are just that, simple!

I assume .... Put the temp probe into fridge, plug heater and fridge into Inkbird. When starting off fermentation set heat at say 22 deg, leave until fermentation finished then re set Inkbird to say 4 deg to cool for x number of days.

Like I said, it seems so obvious that the question is pretty dumb, but occasionally I overthink things!
Yes it is really that easy 🙂

Although I would suggest that you attach the temperature probe to the outside of the fermentation vessel and protect it with either bubble wrap or polystyrene foam over it to allow it to read a more accurate temperature. Remember the centre of the fermenting wort will be 1 to 2 degrees hotter due to yeast activity, but you can easily calibrate the inkbird to allow for this (just follow the instructions with the inkbird)

Hope this helps and happy brewing :smallcheers:
 

Baz Chaz

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Yes it is really that easy 🙂

Although I would suggest that you attach the temperature probe to the outside of the fermentation vessel and protect it with either bubble wrap or polystyrene foam over it to allow it to read a more accurate temperature. Remember the centre of the fermenting wort will be 1 to 2 degrees hotter due to yeast activity, but you can easily calibrate the inkbird to allow for this (just follow the instructions with the inkbird)

Hope this helps and happy brewing :smallcheers:
Thanks for that, nice to hear that it is exactly as thought and as simple!

Cheers
 

stan.distortion

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Those of you with 2 brews in the same fridge, I am wanting to do this but I usually do ramped temperature fermentation so wondering how many of you do this and how you manage it with 2 brews?
Do you mean like a split vertical fridge freezer or a single tall larder fridge? I've no idea for the larder fridge but a split fridge freezer works surprisingly well here, the fridge section can be in the mid 20s and the freezer close to zero without seeming to effect each other. I'm guessing I struck lucky with that, as far as I can tell it ran the freezer at a fixed temperature and circulated air from there to the fridge part governed by the fridge thermostat. All that's disconnected now, no air ducts blocked up and it works fine, ramping down the freezer doesn't seem to make any extra work for the heater in the fridge side but maybe other fridge freezers don't work the same way.
 

Galena

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Do you mean like a split vertical fridge freezer or a single tall larder fridge? I've no idea for the larder fridge but a split fridge freezer works surprisingly well here, the fridge section can be in the mid 20s and the freezer close to zero without seeming to effect each other. I'm guessing I struck lucky with that, as far as I can tell it ran the freezer at a fixed temperature and circulated air from there to the fridge part governed by the fridge thermostat. All that's disconnected now, no air ducts blocked up and it works fine, ramping down the freezer doesn't seem to make any extra work for the heater in the fridge side but maybe other fridge freezers don't work the same way.
I meant in a tall larder fridge
2 parts to my question I suppose
1) If I have the lower FV with an insulated inkbird will the temperature in the second FV match pretty close or will the fluctuation be a problem?
2)f I move temp up 1 deg a day from say 17 - 20 and then hold at 20 degrees how do I start another brew at 17 degrees?
I suppose as I have 2 brewfridges I could start in the second fridge and transfer once they are both on the same temperature, sorry if that sounds a bit convoluted. :laugh8:
 

Merkin

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Is it really as simple and straightforward as it looks? or have I missed something? Although some of the best designed things are just that, simple!
I gained an Inkbird among a load of brewing gear I bought when just setting up again. I have pretty limited space at the moment, and the Inkbird has made everything so much more practical.
I think I would go for the wi-fi version if I was to buy one new - wife is fed up with me walking in front of the TV to check my temps!
 

Galena

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@Galena I have 2 fermenters in a tall fridge. The top one is roughly 1c higher. I use a heat mat on each with the bottom one connected to the fridge as well. Works fine, you probably dont need another inkbird but its handy to check with.
Thank you, that could be manageable I guess I should get myself a thermometer to monitor the temperature in the upper area of the fridge and see how it compares.
 

NPi

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Thank you, that could be manageable I guess I should get myself a thermometer to monitor the temperature in the upper area of the fridge and see how it compares.
Consider installing a PC fan to the fridge, this would help circulate the air and give you a consistent temperature across the fridge.
 

BeerCat

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Thank you, that could be manageable I guess I should get myself a thermometer to monitor the temperature in the upper area of the fridge and see how it compares.
Tape your probe onto the top one for half an hour and you will see. Today the difference in mine reads 0.7c. If you use heat mats/belts you don't need a fan.
I am referring to fermenting lower and ambient temp.
 

Galena

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Consider installing a PC fan to the fridge, this would help circulate the air and give you a consistent temperature across the fridge.
Yes, something Ive been meaning to do, is that a USB fan? So would I need an extension usb cable to run it out to a socket?
 

Galena

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Tape your probe onto the top one for half an hour and you will see. Today the difference in mine reads 0.7c. If you use heat mats/belts you don't need a fan.
I am referring to fermenting lower and ambient temp.
Great thanks, I will give that a try
 
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