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foxy

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Why oh why do the SWMBO's of this world insist on opening an outside door or windows without checking the status of the other doors and windows in the house?

Apart from the potential damage and the rude awakening, I swear that the noise of a door slamming in the wind is much worse than a Hoover or a baby crying!

Yesterday, the wind-speed in Sleaford was "gusting to 31 mies per hour" and SWMBO decided to open the conservatory French Windows and hold them ajar with a 1.5kg door-stop. aheadbutt aheadbutt

The "BANG!" as an inner slammed shut got me out of my chair in time to save the situation before we needed two new French windows in the conservatory.
My wife is the same, front door and back door wide open, making a wind tunnel down the hallway, at least she has learnt to put a door stop in between the kitchen and the hallway door.
 

Dutto

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How's that leg Dutto?
Thanks for asking.

Good news from the Surgeon on the 9th July when he said "You can now 'weight bear' on your left leg ..." athumb.. this was after 14 weeks of sitting in a chair so I was chuffed to bits; right up until he followed on with "... as much as the pain allows!"

Four weeks on, I can hobble around the house and out to the car on a Zimmer Frame (crutches have beeb forbidden by the Physiotherapist for some reason), I can drive the car (automatic) for a couple of hours at a time and I can even do my exercises three time per day without feeling too fatigued!

The main problem has been the fact that I was as weak as a kitten when I started and the Surgeon was correct about "the pain" which can be severe. (Mainly when breaking the adhesions that built up during the time I was sitting in the chair.)

Later today (Amazon permitting) I take delivery of one of these ...


... and hope that it allows me to walk more normally than the "Take Two Steps - Stop/Start" system imposed by the Zimmer Frame.

BTW, to get back on topic, the forecast for Sleaford tonight is a steady 15*C all night, before starting to climb at 7am to 24*C by 2 o'clock this afternoon; when I will probably be testing the new "Tri-Walker" out in the garden! athumb.. athumb..
 

GerritT

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foxy

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The best thing to do in hot weather is switch off, don't think about it, its not like cold weather where you can put on more clothing.
I worked in Moomba, in the summer it was minimum 37 C to 40 C every day, doesn't rain for years, 54 C in the compressor house, and though you would drink litres and litres of water never pee. Winter was great 25 to 26 C.
 

kelper

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When it's 37 or more, even a fan won't cool you, but it will evaporate water, so a sweaty boilersuit will give you some relief. I worked in some very hot ship's engine rooms. 160F in places. 71C
 

foxy

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When it's 37 or more, even a fan won't cool you, but it will evaporate water, so a sweaty boilersuit will give you some relief. I worked in some very hot ship's engine rooms. 160F in places. 71C
Shorts and singlets was the work gear, no thongs (flip flops) allowed obviously. Installing pumps was carried out during the night, surprising how much the pipework expansion could bend the pumps as the sun came up.
 

kelper

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Had to be a boilersuit as there were too many steam pipes about.....and a steaming bonnet!
 

GerritT

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I worked 3 summers in a slaughterhouse's freezer room. -30C (-22F): best work ever.
 

AdeDunn

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Shorts and singlets was the work gear, no thongs (flip flops) allowed obviously. Installing pumps was carried out during the night, surprising how much the pipework expansion could bend the pumps as the sun came up.
The thong song must seem really strange to you guys? I mean, why is that bloke singing about sandles? :laugh8:

Wish I could just ignore hot weather, but too hot and I often end up with cluster migraine, and that's hard to ignore. Used to be I preferred to be warm, these days comfortable for me is 17-19 degrees C.

I had a summer job in a Burger King once, working the broiler. Worst job ever.... sick...
 

Dutto

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......
I worked in Moomba, in the summer it was minimum 37 C to 40 C every day, doesn't rain for years, 54 C in the compressor house, and though you would drink litres and litres of water never pee. Winter was great 25 to 26 C.
In the late 1990's I worked on a Production Platform, moored south of Chennai in the Bay of Bengal. The AC system broke down for a few weeks and the temperature during the day often hit 50*C in the accommodation.

I then came home to the UK for three days before moving on to another job. This time it was on a Gas Plant near Poltava in Ukraine and the average daytime temperature was -18*C!

On the Platform, the Radio wouldn't work due to the high temperature; and in the Gas Plant accommodation there was a frost patch underneath my work-boots every morning!

I found it a lot easier to cope with the +50*C than the -18*C. This may be because back in the 1980's in Saudi Arabia there was no AC on our squash courts, so we used to wait until the ambient temperature dropped to 30*C before playing squash!

Happy Days? aheadbutt aheadbutt
 

MyQul

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In the late 1990's I worked on a Production Platform, moored south of Chennai in the Bay of Bengal. The AC system broke down for a few weeks and the temperature during the day often hit 50*C in the accommodation.

I then came home to the UK for three days before moving on to another job. This time it was on a Gas Plant near Poltava in Ukraine and the average daytime temperature was -18*C!

On the Platform, the Radio wouldn't work due to the high temperature; and in the Gas Plant accommodation there was a frost patch underneath my work-boots every morning!

I found it a lot easier to cope with the +50*C than the -18*C. This may be because back in the 1980's in Saudi Arabia there was no AC on our squash courts, so we used to wait until the ambient temperature dropped to 30*C before playing squash!

Happy Days? aheadbutt aheadbutt
In the early 2000's I had a job hydrogen mining on the sun. Still got the tan marks from me flip flops
 

dad_of_jon

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Aye, flip flops? Ooooo la de da. We had to walk on the surface of the sun in our bare feet, whilst being whipped, carrying huge sacks of dark matter.
Luxury... we lived in a hole on the sun, and we had no sacks for the dark matter we had to carry it with our bare hands which as a result were compressed to a pin head and in another universe.
 

MyQul

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Luxury... we lived in a hole on the sun, and we had no sacks for the dark matter we had to carry it with our bare hands which as a result were compressed to a pin head and in another universe.
Luxurah!!!....You had a hole? we had to sleep on an event horizon (and very sharp it was too) and work 25 hours a day down a gravity well
 

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