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no boil no chill 1 week wheat beer

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Zephyr259

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You can add hops to the mash but I found it very underwhelming. Steeping them at 75c is better but won't add much bitterness so for the backbone IBU's I boil them. You could of course do both.
What was underwhelming about this method? You talking purely about bitterness here or flavour too? Reason I'm asking is that I'm considering adding the hops to the mash so I can recirculate through my CFC after the sparge, having hops in at that stage is likely to block/restrict the filter so was thinking that the mash would let them infuse then strain them out, also an hour + at 68 - 75c should get a good bit of flavour without bitterness, going to use your method of boiling some in water for IBUs.
 

BeerCat

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What was underwhelming about this method? You talking purely about bitterness here or flavour too? Reason I'm asking is that I'm considering adding the hops to the mash so I can recirculate through my CFC after the sparge, having hops in at that stage is likely to block/restrict the filter so was thinking that the mash would let them infuse then strain them out, also an hour + at 68 - 75c should get a good bit of flavour without bitterness, going to use your method of boiling some in water for IBUs.
When adding hops to the mash I found it extracted very little flavour or bitterness so I settled on boiling for bitterness and steeping for flavour. Perhaps the extracts hindered by the thickness of the grist. I have tried over 100g in the mash and could not really tell if it had done anything..
For a wheat beer I don't steep just boil for about 10 IBU. You could also say boil a few litres of water with your bittering hops then steep some when it dropped to 75c and add that to the wort.
 

Zephyr259

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When adding hops to the mash I found it extracted very little flavour or bitterness so I settled on boiling for bitterness and steeping for flavour. Perhaps the extracts hindered by the thickness of the grist. I have tried over 100g in the mash and could not really tell if it had done anything..
For a wheat beer I don't steep just boil for about 10 IBU. You could also say boil a few litres of water with your bittering hops then steep some when it dropped to 75c and add that to the wort.
Wow, 100g and no sign of them... Steeping for flavour in the hop tea also occurred to me as an option, I guess your quantities are low given it's 10 IBUs but wouldn't a 20 min boil also leave behind a bit of flavour, or is the concentrated boil good at driving everything off?

I'm aiming a bit higher as it's an american wheat I'm making, decided that I'm not too keen on German style ones for now as the lack of noticeable bitterness makes them feel a bit unsatisfying. So this one is going to get a modest amount of citra and about 20 - 25 IBUs.

Thanks for the advice.
 

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Wow, 100g and no sign of them... Steeping for flavour in the hop tea also occurred to me as an option, I guess your quantities are low given it's 10 IBUs but wouldn't a 20 min boil also leave behind a bit of flavour, or is the concentrated boil good at driving everything off?

I'm aiming a bit higher as it's an american wheat I'm making, decided that I'm not too keen on German style ones for now as the lack of noticeable bitterness makes them feel a bit unsatisfying. So this one is going to get a modest amount of citra and about 20 - 25 IBUs.

Thanks for the advice.
The boiled hops smell amazing but I am only adding about 500ml to 25l of wort so in a wheat beer you can't really pick up any hop flavour. I used leaf in the mash before but pellets would work better in a thin mash.
what yeast are you using for your brew? The good thing about 3068 is it tastes good in suspension so no need to wait for it to flocs. Voss works well for a raw hoppy wheat as well.
 

Zephyr259

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The boiled hops smell amazing but I am only adding about 500ml to 25l of wort so in a wheat beer you can't really pick up any hop flavour. I used leaf in the mash before but pellets would work better in a thin mash.
what yeast are you using for your brew? The good thing about 3068 is it tastes good in suspension so no need to wait for it to flocs. Voss works well for a raw hoppy wheat as well.
Yeah, I wondered if the small volume would saturate and then dilute too much in the full brew. Think I'll live dangerously, add the hops to the wort while pasteurising and hop the filter doesn't block too much.

I've still got some 3068 but was planning on Voss or Hornindal. Voss has been reliable and fast for me, Hornindal has taken about a week both times I've used it and one of those ended up with a Belgian/banana flavour so I'm hesitant of it. Saure is a bit funky and I've not used Espe yet but I've heard it's very clean. I'd like some ester and I know what Voss will give me, maybe I'll finally get some orange from it in a raw ale?
 

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Yeah, I wondered if the small volume would saturate and then dilute too much in the full brew. Think I'll live dangerously, add the hops to the wort while pasteurising and hop the filter doesn't block too much.

I've still got some 3068 but was planning on Voss or Hornindal. Voss has been reliable and fast for me, Hornindal has taken about a week both times I've used it and one of those ended up with a Belgian/banana flavour so I'm hesitant of it. Saure is a bit funky and I've not used Espe yet but I've heard it's very clean. I'd like some ester and I know what Voss will give me, maybe I'll finally get some orange from it in a raw ale?
Use a bag for your hops. Saves loads of hassle. Never picked up any esters from Voss but its fast and reliable and would be my choice and i have lots of yeast to choose from.
 

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Has anyone tried the raspberry yet? Bottles really well. A month later and it's still very fruity. I prefer it with a teaspoon of lactose as well. Next batch I might try pineapple or blueberry and reserve some to sour.
 

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I have been playing around with this style of beer for a while now and thought i would share the recipe and method i have been using. It literally is grain to glass in a week.

25l
RO water with 0.19g per litre of calcium chloride
OG 1045
FG 1010
IBU 13
mash at 65c then mashout at 75c once you have full conversion

2.5 kg uk wheat malt
2 kg of maris otter (or pilsner)
150g acid malt
Wyeast 3068
Ferment at 22/23c
12g of magnum boiled in 1 liter of water for 20m strained and added to the fv.

As the title says this beer is not boiled but it is important to make sure its pasteurised. To do this i collect all the wort after mashing and sparging and hold it at 75c for 20 minutes. I also recirculate during this time to prevent and hot or cold spots in the wort. The mash and sparge volumes are really up to you. For a 25l batch i use 31l in total. Thats about 5l lost to grain and 1l of dead space in the boiler. I used to do a fairly small sparge but recently been doing a full volume mash and i seem to get about the same figures. I think it takes a bit longer to fully convert but i always do a long mash. I would recommend checking the gravity as the mash progresses with a refractometer to make sure you hit your figures. You can always add a little more grain if necessary.
Fermentation normally takes 3 or 4 days to complete and on the 6th day i keg it and force carb. There is no need to crash the beer. If i get any yeast come out in the first few pours i don't worry as it tastes great. Last batch i siphoned of 4l onto 500g of raspberries and let that ferment out and bottled. I now have a batch sitting on 3kg of mango made the same way.
For calculating bitterness i use this calc. Boil size would be say a liter. Batch size 25l and OG must be set to 1 as you are boiling water.
Head retention and lacing on these beers is amazing. Flavour wise i dont pick up any cloves just banana from the yeast and the malt. I will post a photo later.

Edit; I have added some acid malt to the recipe as its helpful to get the correct mash ph if using RO water. Obviously if you not it will be dependent on your waters ph so may not be needed.
Is there science to the 12G hops/1L water/20mins bit i.e. have you taken a full boil recipe and scaled it to match the IBUs etc. I'm really interested in no-boil brewing as a concept but I assumed you were very limited by style (basically NEIPA & Saison) - but if there is a deterministic way to do bittering additions like this, that would blow the whole thing wide open!
 

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Is there science to the 12G hops/1L water/20mins bit i.e. have you taken a full boil recipe and scaled it to match the IBUs etc. I'm really interested in no-boil brewing as a concept but I assumed you were very limited by style (basically NEIPA & Saison) - but if there is a deterministic way to do bittering additions like this, that would blow the whole thing wide open!
Yes there is. Use this calc. IBU Calculator Beer Bitterness - Brewer's Friend
Example; Set pre boil size to 1 liter. batch size 25 liter. Target gravity must be set to 1 as your boiling water not wort. Hop utilisation stays at 100%.
Boil 10g of 10AA pellets for 30 minutes and you get 12.23 IBU. You will have about half a liter of tea to add to 25l of wort. If you use more hops simply add a little more water to compensate for evaporation and loss from the hop solids.

Edit. You are not limited by style but brown or red beers tend to look murky unless fined. I mainly do no boil stouts, pales and sours.
 

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I have a no boil oatmeal stout in the bottles. It's really good. My last no boil was a hefeweizen which again turned out great
 

phildo79

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I might give this a blast the next time I do an imp stout. Would certainly speed up brew day.
 

BeerCat

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Most of my no boils do not have any yeast in suspension its really only the wheat beer yeast that takes time to floc. It does save money and time but i would brew like this even if it didn't as i really like the end result.
Well worth trying a dry stout or an oat stout( coconut/chocoalte perhaps) as they really benefit from this method. Better mouthfeel and head retention. I leave them for 2 weeks and use 1084. You could use kveik and turn it around in a week though
@phildo79 People are doing raw kveik RIS's but it might be hard to get a super high gravity. You could always add sugar though to boost it. I use 20% golden syrup in most of mine.
 

phildo79

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@BeerCat I was planning on doing a partial mash with 4kg of DME and 500g of brown sugar so I am not worried about achieving a high og. It will probably be around 1.085
 

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Really interesting thread. I hadn't considered no-boil as a "thing". It really makes sense with hazy styles, especially the neipa with minimal bitterness & max aroma. There has been a lot going on in the brewing world since I followed Dave Line's books in the 70s!
 
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