Re-using yeast from current brew

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I've got a Dubbel that's nearly finished, after a good, vigorous fermentation with Lallbrew "Belgian-style witbier" yeast.

As my next batch includes a Belgian Witbier it seems like a no-brainer to re-use the yeast.
I've done it before, once by re-pitching straight onto the sediment and a few times by just keeping some sediment in the fridge and then making a starter.

Not quite sure which is the best way to go... re-pitching straight onto the yeast cake resulted in an insane amount of sediment (above the level of the bottom tap) which was a pain. Equally it seems unnecessary to make a starter when I've got a large amount of (presumably) healthy and active yeast on hand.

Advice welcome!
 
How much do you reckon to use for repitching? Half a cup?
Not entirely sure. I'm fairly laissez-faire about it all. I haven't repitched into the yeast cake in years as I don't brew often enough. But from memory I probably left about a third of the yeast cake for the second back, or maybe about a cup?

Give it a good old shake as it'll need oxygen to revitalise the yeast
 
In the past I've put the next brew straight onto the yeast cake. Worked ok. Also just taken 3 or 4 spoonfulls from the yeastcake and added it to next brew. Also worked ok. With cider I've also just slung the sediment from 3 or 4 bottles into the next brew and that also worked ok.
 
I always save my slurry. I sterilise a jam jar and pour the yeast cake in, Pop in fridge. I take out a couple of hours before I pitch to get it up to room temperature (slightly loosen the lid) .. Iv had the yeast in the fridge for up to a 2/3 month and never had a problem, I do tend to throw some yeast nutrient in the FV. Its a no brainer, saves time and £.
IMG_8736.jpeg
 
I'm also trying mashbag's idea of just freezing the yeast slurry. I'll probably pull it out in 6 months and see how it works
 
I have been using some 013 London yeast which was given to me in the days of Covid. I use it whenever I brew my bitter beers.
I treat it the same as above, put some good spoonfuls in a Kilner jar and keep in the fridge and warm it to 20C the morning of the next brew.
 
This is what I have done in the past when I've painstakingly cultured up a yeast from bottles, and had a successful brew so know the yeast is good (as well as top cropping, but that's a different topic).

I leave an inch or so of beer in the FV on top of the yeast. This is swilled around, bringing yeast into suspension. It's left a couple of mins for the heavier detritus to settle, then the yeasty liquid transferred into a large jar. When it settles, you should get mostly yeasty trub, that, in theory (according to what I have read) is the more healthy, active yeast. Might be a load of old cobblers, but it worked for me. It certainly leaves the darker, more "cruddy" stuff behind.

The jar of yeasty liquid is left to settle on the fridge, then at usage time, the "beer" portion decanted off and the yeast pitched. Very unscientific when it comes to pitch rates.

Usual caveats apply - worked for me, sample size of 1, your results may vary, etc athumb..
 
I think it is different with some yeasts Baldy, I am sure some members have a better idea of which yeasts are better.
You can dry Kveik which then keeps for a long time in a dehydrator or a very low oven on baking parchment
 
This is what I have done in the past when I've painstakingly cultured up a yeast from bottles, and had a successful brew so know the yeast is good (as well as top cropping, but that's a different topic).

I leave an inch or so of beer in the FV on top of the yeast. This is swilled around, bringing yeast into suspension. It's left a couple of mins for the heavier detritus to settle, then the yeasty liquid transferred into a large jar. When it settles, you should get mostly yeasty trub, that, in theory (according to what I have read) is the more healthy, active yeast. Might be a load of old cobblers, but it worked for me. It certainly leaves the darker, more "cruddy" stuff behind.

The jar of yeasty liquid is left to settle on the fridge, then at usage time, the "beer" portion decanted off and the yeast pitched. Very unscientific when it comes to pitch rates.

Usual caveats apply - worked for me, sample size of 1, your results may vary, etc athumb..
Exactly what I do Marsh
 
Same here, leave a smidge of beer on the trub and gently swirl the fermenter to get that top bit of yeast that was the very last to drop out of suspension.
Pour it in to a PET bottle and screw the lid on.

I've had bottles in the fridge for months without issue, but never thought of freezing them

Gives me an idea to save a bottle of every yeast I use from every brew day and create my own yeast library. Unlike others, I am happy to reuse a yeast 3 or 4 times using the above method.
 
I normally just do as above, trub saved in a jar in the fridge
same. i save it all .

by my calculatoions when i repitch 8 oz or so it contains about 10 thousand million bagajillion cells. so it usually takes right off. 😉

one thing i have noticed is that when i take it out to repitch loosen the lid as said above but also pour off the beer on top ( you can do a smell and taste test.) if you dont the reactivated yeast will often rise to the top from the co2 and then you cant really decant it cause it gets mixed .
 

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