winter ale - not spicy

Discussion in 'General Recipe Discussion' started by kelper, Oct 13, 2019.

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  1. Oct 13, 2019 #1

    kelper

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    I have just moved from kits to extract to all grain. What would make a really good winter ale but without spices? Is it just a strong ale? I really liked Gales winter ale but that was forty years ago. It tasted like diesel according to my fellow students.

    I think it was quaffable because it was only lightly carbonated. It was a cask ale, not a keg. It seemed like their HSB in that it didn't really have much head, just a few, large bubbles. It certainly wasn't flat. But that was in Southampton where they don't like gassy beers. My tastes changed when I moved to Hartlepool! But still, I don't like lagers or gassy beers generally.
     
  2. Oct 13, 2019 #2

    strange-steve

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    For me a winter beer is a strong, dark sipper, so maybe something like a Belgian quad (tastes like liquid Christmas cake to me :thumba:), or a barley wine, an imperial stout, or even a doppelbock.
     
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  3. Oct 13, 2019 #3

    kelper

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    I love Belgian Dubels, Tripels and even Quads but that's not what I'm after. I must try some Imperial Stouts but I don't really like that style yet :laugh8:

    I'm loving the English Trappist beers I have in my beer fridge.

    Why does a 10% Trappist taste stronger than a 14% wine?
     
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  4. Oct 13, 2019 #4

    Deadhead

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  5. Oct 13, 2019 #5

    MyQul

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    For me it's doesn't need to be strong (I much prefer session strength beers), but winter beer means malty. A scottish shilling beer might fit the bill? I just made a session strength bitter (OG 1.037), no late hops with moderate bitterness, highish FG of 1.012 (used MJ Empire ale yeast to achieve this)
     
  6. Oct 13, 2019 #6

    Sadfield

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    Perhaps look at some historic Mild recipes, when mild meant something different to what it does now.

    Basically, a high gravity pale ale with British hops and yeast, pale malt and perhaps some dark sugar or a pinch of roasted barley to colour. Very much similar to the shilling ales @MyQul suggests. Somewhere between an ESB and a Barleywine.
     
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  7. Oct 13, 2019 #7

    MyQul

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    I put some homemade golden syrup in my malty winter bitter. It was a lot darker than golden as I accidentley let it caramalise too long - but I think this may be a good thing
     
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  8. Oct 13, 2019 #8

    davidfromUS

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    I agree with a Quad or an old ale for winter. I've made that exact Gale's recipe mentioned three times now. It took three months before it was great.
     
  9. Oct 13, 2019 #9

    MyQul

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    Do you have a recipe for the Gales beer?
     
  10. Oct 13, 2019 #10

    davidfromUS

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    It's the same one @Deadhead posted above except for the below. Now I'm wondering if the recipe above is an improvement since my recipe from BYO is from a magazine that's probably older? I love how what my recipe says turns out. I do extract but I can imagine the all grain one being great as well.
    Below is what's in my magazine that's different for extract:
    .76 kg 2-row Maris Otter
    1.1 kg Muntons Light DME
    3 kg Muntons Light LME
    1 C corn sugar
    For all grain the only differences from posted recipe above are 6.6 kg Maris Otter and the 1 C corn sugar.
    I do use yeast nutrients and am considering soaked oak cubes in batch four since Gale's is barrel aged (don't quote me on that part though).
     
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  11. Oct 13, 2019 #11

    ACBEV

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  12. Oct 14, 2019 #12

    kelper

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    how much? What is 'C'
     
  13. Oct 14, 2019 #13

    kelper

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    If I was going to do a clone, I'd like to clone Gales' Winter Ale! I like the idea of a mild. Thanks for all the suggestions. I'm drawing from three PBs at present and must wait till one is nearly empty or I will have nowhere to put it after fermentation. But today will be dry so maybe I should do an outdoor brew today? The weather in this part of Scotland is very localised and we seem to be drier than most.
     
  14. Oct 14, 2019 #14

    kelper

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    I never did like Scotch beers or anything with Shillings in the name. They always seemed to taste of caramel. I know caramel colouring has no taste but that's what I sensed.
    I'd love a pint of M&B Brew XI for old times' sake 'specially brewed for the Men of the Midlands'. I cut my teeth on that one.
     
  15. Oct 14, 2019 #15

    davidfromUS

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    Sorry, that's my own abbreviation for cup. US measurement.
     
  16. Oct 14, 2019 #16

    kelper

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    Thanks. It seems that Gales Winter Ale was an occasional brew, different each time. I've been nerding and I think this recipe might be a good'un. I've also discovered, thanks to this thread, that Fullers still make Gales HSB!
     
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  17. Oct 14, 2019 #17

    Sadfield

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    Some good suggestions, but perhaps a different approach might help. Maybe @kelper could describe the beer in mind, flavours, body and ABV, and the combined experience of those on the thread could design a suitable recipe.
     
  18. Oct 14, 2019 #18

    kelper

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    As I said in post #1, I liked Gales Winter Ale. It was probably similar to Prize Old Ale, which was 9% ABV. I certainly found it hard to stay awake in college after two pints at lunchtime!
     
  19. Oct 14, 2019 #19

    Sadfield

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    Fair enough. According to ratebeer and other sources, it was the Butser Bitter blended with Prize Old Ale to 4.2%.

    Here's the actual Gales Prized Old Ale recipe.

    https://www.marblebeers.com/prize-old-ale/

    Break out the Brett.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
  20. Oct 14, 2019 #20

    ACBEV

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    Southern English Old Ales I've had on tap are like stronger dark milds, around 4.5 to 5.5 ABV.

    An example... Harveys Old Ale...

    Soft and full-bodied, with hints of dried fruits and dates. Rich, dark and warming. To be enjoyed in the autumn and winter months by a roaring fire.
     
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