Pale Amber Malt

Discussion in 'Grain, Hops, Yeast & Water' started by An Ankoù, Feb 14, 2019.

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  1. Feb 14, 2019 #1

    An Ankoù

    An Ankoù

    An Ankoù

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    Good morning World.
    Has anybody tried any of the recipes from "Old British Beers and How to Make Them" from the Durden Park Beer Circle?
    They make reference to a supposedly obsolete malt called Pale Amber Malt - a diastatic malt at 30-40 ebc. I don't fancy following their suggestions for roasting my own if I can find something on the market. I'm thinking of Simpsons Imperial Malt- a little darker, but still enzymatic. Any suggestions?
    I think Alsacebrew said he used at least one of these recipes, but I can't find the thread.
    Happy brewing
    Mike
     
  2. Feb 14, 2019 #2

    peebee

    peebee

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    My conclusions (which could therefore be wrong!) is a lot of "British" malt names have fallen out of favour (or have no chance of coming back in favour) because of the "American" craft-brewing <sic> movement which supports these "continental" names.

    So using UK "Imperial" malt (at 45EBC) instead of Light Amber seems to me to be perfectly good. Or I'd perhaps prefer UK Light "Munich" malt (at 25-30EBC) which will certainly be more diastatic.

    There was a similar discussion about all these "Cara" malts being no different to the various grades (light, medium, dark, etc.) of UK crystal malts.
     
  3. Feb 15, 2019 #3

    Zephyr259

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    I've got the book and keep meaning to make the Simmon's Bitter and Whitbread Porter (both on the website funnily enough), but haven't got to them in 2 years. I was going to use Weyermann Munich II instead, it's about 20 EBC so maybe double the quantity. Then I realised that I have Weyermann Abbey malt which is the same idea as Simpson's Imperial so I'd probably use that. Abbey malt can be used up to 50% where Simpsons say Imperial can go up to 80% in dark beers. Any of the above should give a great beer I'd imagine.

    Let us know how it comes out, I really need to get round to brewing these.
     
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  4. Feb 15, 2019 #4

    An Ankoù

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    Will do. The recommended maturation time is long, though.
    Pointless trying to contact DPBC, by the way, had two email addresses in the contacts list and both my enquiries failed to be delivered.
     
  5. Feb 15, 2019 #5

    Zephyr259

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    I got a couple of replies from Alex Kovacevic and then he forwarded on my question to another member. Would you like the email address I got to work? Was back in 2017 though so maybe it's broken now.
     
  6. Feb 15, 2019 #6

    An Ankoù

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    That would be great. Thanks.
     
  7. Feb 15, 2019 #7

    peebee

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    @An Ankoù I see you're in France. So you can ignore my "UK protectionist" post. I would encourage the use of "continental" malts; on the continent, not here in the UK!
     
  8. Feb 16, 2019 #8

    alsacebrew

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    Hi, yes I mentioned the Whitbread’s London Porter recipe from the Durden Park book, which I brew at least once a year. It is a lovely Porter. I tweak the recipe a bit though, by replacing about a quarter of the base malt with smoked malt which, once mellowed, adds a subtle complexity to the beer.
    I’ve also brewed the Amber Small Beer (recipe no 1) from the same book and used a Crisp amber malt (50 ebc), it was a very good beer.
    I am currently cold crashing a beer (“quaffable bitter” recipe by James Morton) in which I replaced 10% of the base malt with imperial malt. I’ve already drank a couple of pints of it straight from the FV, it is so good! It is amazingly malty and has a very gentle roastiness (for want of a better word!) to it. This was the first time I used imperial malt but I am now very tempted to brew a beer with 50% imperial and 50% MO base malt with some progress and EKGs.
     
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  9. Feb 16, 2019 #9

    An Ankoù

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    Damn. I've already got six fully formulated recipes in my brewing log which I haven't had time to brew yet. Looks like that list is going to get longer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2019
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  10. Feb 16, 2019 #10

    An Ankoù

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    Double damn. I hadn't heard of James Morton. Just found a copy on Amazon.fr for 6,48 euros. I need help!
     
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