Stout Colour

Discussion in 'General Recipe Discussion' started by darrellm, Mar 4, 2019.

Help Support The Homebrew Forum UK by donating:

  1. Mar 4, 2019 #1

    darrellm

    darrellm

    darrellm

    Landlord. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2011
    Messages:
    1,917
    Likes Received:
    591
    Location:
    Near Malvern
    I've always thought of Stouts as black beers but notice that some recipes have a range of colours.

    Juts bottled the GH Oatmeal Stout this morning and it's decidedly dark brown, I upped the original recipe colour a tad to 47 EBC and thought it looked a bit light, should've used some black malt I suppose.

    Sample tastes great but I'm drinking it with my eyes and well as my mouth and the colour is a but off-putting. What do others think?
     
  2. Mar 4, 2019 #2

    Clint

    Clint

    Clint

    Hammered.....

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2016
    Messages:
    6,137
    Likes Received:
    2,722
    Location:
    North Wales
    Stout originally meant strong but I get what you mean. It's like a BIPA ..or a dark lager....totally unexpected if you haven't been forewarned.
     
  3. Mar 4, 2019 #3

    MmmBeer

    MmmBeer

    MmmBeer

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2017
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    224
    Location:
    Bromsgrove
    On a recent visit to a local brewery I noticed that they produce a White Stout. The power of Google shows it's quite a common idea.


    Don't expect this though.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Mar 4, 2019 #4

    Sadfield

    Sadfield

    Sadfield

    Landlord.

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2016
    Messages:
    2,050
    Likes Received:
    1,042
    Location:
    Macclesfield
    Either, or. Presumably, stouts and porters were originally brown from being brewed with old style (diastatic) Brown Malt.
     
  5. Mar 4, 2019 #5

    Madhouse

    Madhouse

    Madhouse

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2018
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    17
    Stumbled across this while trying to work out if there was a difference between a stout and a porter. As Clint says, stout originally just meant strong, so in theory you would have had a stout porter as well as a stout pale. Skip forward a century or two and we associate stout with colour rather than strength and have to google if there's a difference between a stout and porter.
     
    Cwrw666 likes this.
  6. Mar 4, 2019 #6

    Covrich

    Covrich

    Covrich

    Sith Acolyte Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2014
    Messages:
    4,786
    Likes Received:
    1,642
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    If you cold steep the malts you get less colour, they can be like coca cola rather than jetblack
     
  7. Mar 4, 2019 #7

    phildo79

    phildo79

    phildo79

    Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2014
    Messages:
    471
    Likes Received:
    109
    Location:
    N. Ireland
    I think the popularity and abundance of Guinness has helped the notion that stout should be black (even though Guinness is ruby red, apparently). Either way, it's what we expect nowadays. So when we get a white stout (which is usually a pale, sh1t brown colour), we do what everyone does and take our first bite with our eyes. And this can have a negative impact on our perception of the beer.

    Someone recommended ABC Flat White stout to me and I wish I had ignored him. Not only did it look unappealing, it tasted pretty crap as well. But he liked it...
     
  8. Mar 4, 2019 #8

    An Ankoù

    An Ankoù

    An Ankoù

    Landlord.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2019
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    219
    Location:
    Brittany, France
    I've heard of this one. Milk stout, isn't it?
     
  9. Mar 4, 2019 #9

    Cwrw666

    Cwrw666

    Cwrw666

    Landlord.

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2014
    Messages:
    2,013
    Likes Received:
    935
    Location:
    North Pembs.
    In the 1800s there was no difference between porter and stout (stout porter actually) other than it's strength. Then the government changed the tax system - it used to be on the ingredients and so it was illegal to use anything but malt and hops in beer. Then they changed it so that a brewer could use anything in beer and the tax was on the beer, not the ingredients. So breweries shovelled roast barley in instead of roast malts as it was cheaper. And that's why we think stout should be black.
     
  10. Mar 4, 2019 #10

    HoppyTommy

    HoppyTommy

    HoppyTommy

    Junior Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2017
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Stone, Staffordshire
    I can confirm it is ruby red. My mate at Uni drank about 10 pints of Guinness one St Patrick's day and vomited in spectacular style. We all thought it was blood initially but one slightly more seasoned drinker pointed out the ruby red nature of Guinness!!!
     
  11. Mar 4, 2019 #11

    simon12

    simon12

    simon12

    Landlord.

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2014
    Messages:
    2,045
    Likes Received:
    535
    That's slightly different to the story I got somewhere. My version is porter was made from brown malt until they realised (when the hydrometer was invented) that it was cheaper to use the more expensive pale malt and add roast barley (tax free). Very quickly HMRC banned unmalted (tax free) grains so they used roast malt instead.
     

Share This Page