Covid the jab and the final stage.

Help Support The HomeBrew Forum:

Oneflewover

Landlord.
Joined
Jul 10, 2016
Messages
1,863
Reaction score
1,184
Location
Dorsetshire
If you need to ask that question then it shows how conditioned you are imho. Seems you accept just what your tv tells you. Have you read the SI.?
Ive been thru LHR 3 times since last oct without any problems. Tbh whats delivered on your tel lie box is far from whats happening. Its all about keeping up the fear.
Stay safe wash hands
I have literally no idea what you are bleating on about. Probably for the best.
 

HSD

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
113
Reaction score
76
Vaguely on topic, my son’s (11) favourite joke this week:
One cow says to another, “How do you shoo your flies?” The other replies, “I don’t bother, I let them go barefoot”!
 

Manxnorton

Senior Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
2,153
Reaction score
625
Location
Newcastle
spent 25 used to abbreviations in the forces, but don't to add to this but it went over my tiny brain.
 

Coffin Dodger

Vintage Brewer
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
Messages
406
Reaction score
389
Location
Dartmoor
Vaguely on topic, my son’s (11) favourite joke this week:
One cow says to another, “How do you shoo your flies?” The other replies, “I don’t bother, I let them go barefoot”!
And there was a cow from Huddersfield who liked to have her udders feeled.
 
  • Like
Reactions: HSD

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
34,611
Reaction score
9,440
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
A single shot of either the Oxford-AstraZeneca or the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid jab reduces the chance of needing hospital treatment by more than 80%, an analysis in England shows.

The Public Health England data - based on people over 80 - follows similarly 'spectacular' results in Scotland.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the findings were "very strong".

More than 20 million people have received their first dose of Covid vaccine in the UK.

That's more than a third of the adult population.
Mr Hancock said the vaccine results "may also help to explain why the number of Covid admissions to intensive care units among people over 80 in the UK have dropped to single figures in the last couple of weeks".

The latest daily figures show there were 104 deaths recorded within 28 days of a positive test for coronavirus reported on 1 March 2021.

This takes the number of deaths within 28 days of a positive test to 122,953.

There were also 5,455 new infections recorded in the last 24 hours.

Dr Mary Ramsay, Public Health England's head of immunisation, said there was growing evidence showing that the vaccines were working to reduce infections and save lives.

"While there remains much more data to follow, this is encouraging and we are increasingly confident that vaccines are making a real difference."

The PHE data also suggests the Pfizer vaccine, which started being rolled out a month before the AstraZeneca vaccine, leads to an 83% reduction in deaths from Covid.

And it shows vaccination cuts the risk of people over 70 developing any Covid symptoms by around 60% three weeks after a first dose.

 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
34,611
Reaction score
9,440
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
People are being warned to keep an eye on their skin amid four Covid-19 skin complaints, with rashes the only sign for one in five people.

By now, most people are well aware of the main coronavirus symptoms which are a fever, a dry cough, and a loss of taste and smell.

Other signs people should look out for headaches, muscle and joint pain, nasal congestion and fatigue.
But it turns out skin conditions are also having an impact on those diagnosed with the virus, these have been slower to be reported, partly due to the wide variety that have appeared in COVID-19 patients, making it more challenging to establish a consistent correlation.

Vassilios Vassiliou, Senior Clinical Lecturer in Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of East Anglia and Subothini Sara Selvendran, Visiting Researcher in Medicine, University of East Anglia wrote for The Conversation, detailing what to look out for.

Chilblain-like lesions, maculopapular rash, hives and vesicular lesions are listed as the four skin conditions you should look out for.

Here is what they say.

Chilblain-like lesions

These are red, swollen or blistering skin lesions that affect mainly the toes and soles of the feet, colloquially known as “COVID toes”. Over the course of one to two weeks, the lesions will become even more discoloured and will flatten, and after this they will spontaneously resolve without treatment.

A substantial number of these lesions have been seen, primarily in adolescents and young adults with no or only mild symptoms of COVID-19. They make up the majority of skin issues associated with the virus. In two international reports on different types of suspected COVID-related skin conditions, around 60% of patients with skin complaints reported these lesions.

However, given these lesions correlate with mild disease, many of the patients with them in these studies didn’t qualify for a COVID-19 test at the time, and 55% were otherwise asymptomatic. So while the swift rise of these lesions during the pandemic suggests they’re associated with COVID-19, direct confirmation of this hasn’t been established. It’s possible they’re caused by some other relate factor.

1614870851295.png


Exactly when they appear is also somewhat unclear. In a study analysing 26 patients with suspected COVID-related skin changes, 73% presented with chilblain-like lesions. None of the patients had respiratory symptoms and they were all COVID-negative at the onset of their lesions. An explanation is that these lesions appear only after a long delay – up to 30 days after infection.

The cause of these lesions has been debated. A possible culprit could be type 1 interferons, proteins that regulate the antiviral properties of the immune system. The theory is that high production of these interferons might result in patients rapidly clearing the coronavirus, but also cause injury to blood vessels and increased inflammation. This would explain the coincidence of mild or nonexistent disease, negative tests and skin damage.

Another theory concerns ACE2, the molecule that the coronavirus uses to get inside cells. It is present on many types of cell, including those in the sweat glands, which are common on the palms of the hand and soles of the feet. This could make these areas particularly vulnerable to damage from the virus.

Or, it could be that damage to blood vessels, caused either by the immune response or the virus, leads to cell death and multiple mini blood clots in the toes.

Maculopapular rash

This term describes both flat and raised areas of discoloured skin. A study of 375 patients in Spain found that 47% of patients with COVID-related skin changes had this kind of rash.

These were associated with more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and were mainly found on the trunk in middle-aged to elderly patients. They tended to last 7-18 days, appearing 20-36 days after infection.

A suggested cause is the body’s immune system going into overdrive. In some patients, a hyperinflammatory phase occurs 7-10 days after infection, which leads to tissue damage and, potentially, more severe disease and death.

Hives

Also known as urticaria, these are raised areas of itchy skin. In a study involving four hospitals in China and Italy, 26% of COVID-19 patients that complained of skin changes presented with hives.

Hives typically precede or present at the same time as other symptoms, making them useful for diagnosis. They are more common among middle-aged patients and are associated with more severe disease. Viral infections are a known trigger of hives, as they cause the breakdown of cells and the release of histamine through a cascade of reactions in the immune system.

1614870927402.png


However, it’s important to remember that hives are also a noted side-effect of many drugs that have been used to treat COVID-19, such as corticosteroids and remdesevir.

Vesicular lesions

These are clear fluid-filled sacs under the skin, similar to those seen in chicken pox. They are less common compared to the skin conditions above: in the previously mentioned Spanish study of skin changes associated with COVID-19, only 9% of patients had these vesicles.

However, they are thought to be a more specific indication of someone having COVID-19 than those already listed, and so are more useful for diagnosis. They appear to present in patients with mild disease around 14 days after infection. It’s thought that they’re caused by prolonged inflammation, with antibodies attacking the skin and damaging its layers, resulting in fluid-filled sacs.

 

DavieC

Landlord.
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
599
Reaction score
354
I received the very sad news yesterday that a friend from the local pub passed away' yesterday after catching covid in hospital.He has suffered with bad asthma/ breathing difficulties for the past 18 months but prior to that was working and active.Age 62,. He had his first jab in January and was admitted to hospital last week for his breathing problems, caught the virus, suffered a heart attack and then sadly died yesterday.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
34,611
Reaction score
9,440
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
Sorry to hear that Dave.

The jab has made a huge difference but sadly this shows no one is 100% safe.
 

Latest posts

Top